. Open Source Voting: Accurate, Accountable | Open Voting Consortium

Open Source Voting: Accurate, Accountable

The future of voting technology

Among other things, OVC developed an open source ballot printer system ten years ago. We've changed, the world is changing. It's 2014: Now we trust our smartphones for banking, email, private messages, and many other functions. The California Association of Voting Officials (CAVO) just might make this work. See the video PSA narrated by the great Peter Coyote.

Current Efforts

OVC's three founders, Alan Dechert, Arthur Keller, and Doug Jones continue to work on the issue of voting system integrity. Doug Jones (with Barbara Simons) recently finished writing Broken Ballots. Arthur Keller is chair of the IEEE 1622 standards committee. Brent Turner tendered the OVC system to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy in early 2012. Turner is currently board secretary at CAVO (California Association of Voting Officials).

Recent News & Events

Ohio's Odd Numbers

By CHRISTOPHER HITCHENS
Vanity Fair

Are the stories of vote suppression and rigged machines to be believed? Here is "non-wacko" evidence that something went seriously awry in the Buckeye State on Election Day 2004

If it were not for Kenyon College, I might have missed, or skipped, the whole controversy. The place is a visiting lecturer's dream, or the ideal of a campus-movie director in search of a setting. It is situated in wooded Ohio hills, in the small town of Gambier, about an hour's drive from Columbus. Its literary magazine, The Kenyon Review, was founded by John Crowe Ransom in 1939. Its alumni include Paul Newman, E. L. Doctorow, Jonathan Winters, Robert Lowell, Chief Justice William Rehnquist, and President Rutherford B. Hayes. The college's origins are Episcopalian, its students well mannered and well off and predominantly white, but it is by no means Bush-Cheney territory. Arriving to speak there a few days after the presidential election, I found that the place was still buzzing. Here's what happened in Gambier, Ohio, on decision day 2004.

The touch-screen holy grail

San Jose Mercury News Editorial

An electronic voting system that's cheap, secure, accurate and easy to use. One that uses `off-the`-shelf hardware and publicly examinable software. One that voters can trust.

A prototype of such a system -- the holy grail of election officials -- was on display last week in San Jose. It looked like the real deal.

Had the federal government underwritten the research behind it years ago, such a system might now be making its debut in voting booths. Instead, the demonstration took place in a conference room at the county government building with its creators in search of financial backers and government grants.

Open system might plug up holes in the e-voting process

by Mike Himowitz
Baltimore Sun

WHILE ELECTION officials, lawmakers and critics in Maryland and other states squabble over the reliability of electronic voting systems, a small group of computer scientists and engineers has been developing one that might actually work.

The Open Voting Consortium is scheduled to demonstrate a prototype today in San Jose, Calif. You can try a version yourself on the Web at www.open votingconsortium.org.

Although it's far from a finished product, the system retains what's good about current electronic voting systems. It's voter-friendly, easier than older systems to administer, and accessible to blind voters without assistance.

Study finds computer voting system widely vulnerable to tampering

by Brian Witte
Associated Press

An electronic voting system used in some states as an alternative to the troublesome punch-card ballots is highly vulnerable to fraud, computer security experts warned in a study released Thursday.

The study found "significant security flaws" with the system designed by Diebold Election Systems. The system was vulnerable to unscrupulous voters as well as "insiders such as poll workers, software developers and even janitors," who could cast multiple votes without a trace, the study said.

The system allows ballots to be cast on a 15-inch touchscreen.

The study was the first review of the software by independent researchers.

Study finds computer voting system widely vulnerable to tampering

Brian Witte
The Associated Press

An electronic voting system used in some states as an alternative to the troublesome punch-card ballots is highly vulnerable to fraud, computer security experts warned in a study released Thursday.

The study found "significant security flaws" with the system designed by Diebold Election Systems. The system was vulnerable to unscrupulous voters as well as "insiders such as poll workers, software developers and even janitors," who could cast multiple votes without a trace, the study said.

The system allows ballots to be cast on a 15-inch touchscreen.

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